Type1.5 L, Direct Injected, 4 cylinder 

HP                    

130 @ 5400 RPM
Weight220 lbs/100 kg
Gearbox Ratio2.33/1
Takeoff RPMEngine 5600
Prop 2400
Cruise RPMEngine 4900
Prop 2100
Static RPM - STOL AircraftEngine 5400 RPM

Prop 2400 RPM

Static RPM - 

Cross Country Aircraft

Engine 4800 RPM
Prop 2100 RPM
Coolant Temperature180-220 F
Oil Temperature Not Measured 
Oil Pressure20-80 Psi
Fuel Pressure43 Psi
Fuel100LL/ 89+ Octane Auto Fuel
Length27 in/685mm
Height 24 in/610mm
Width22 in/560mm
Gearbox Oil/Type/Quantity75W-90 Mobile One Synthetic Gear Oil/6 oz
Engine Oil0W-20
CoolantEvans NPG Plus
Coolant System Pressure4 Psi


Aircraft - CH-750 STOL 

Engine - O-290

Weights - Left and Right Mains (330 lbs. each) Nose 300 lbs. 


PERFORMANCE OF THE LYCOMING 235 IN LOW WINGED ZENITH AIRCRAFT

Internet Forum Source:
"I have an O-235-C1, one of the earlier O-235 versions.
Normal cruise is about 90 knots (104mph) at 2550 rpm. Fuel consumption is around 6.5 gph.

Internet Forum Source:
"I have the L2C 0-235"
"I have used 2400 rpm to do my testing and I indicate about 120 MPH"
"I'm burning around 7.5 GPH with out any leaning."

PERFORMANCE OF THE VIKING 130 IN LOW WINGED ZENITH AIRCRAFT

DICK JONES
"5.4 gallons per hour. True airspeed 135 mph."
N624RJ

PATRICK HOYT
"Test flew with a new passenger cabin vent. Wonderful. Air was calm, so I opened it up a bit. 155mph..."

From the chart above, The Viking 130 clearly outperform the UL130 engine

  • Slower and larger propeller for more thrust
  • Additional torque
  • Lower fuel flow

Viking 130 HP Engine

It has not really hit the aviation community yet how many advantages a Direct Injected Engine has. It is a perfect match to high output, low fuel burn, high compression, advanced ignition timing, internal cylinder cooling of engine parts and a high threshold for detonation. 


The discussion is no longer about old or new technology, air or liquid cooled, car engine or lookalike aircraft engine with internal car parts, fuel injection or carburetor, etc. It is now about Direct Injection or not.


It is a choice you can only make by understanding the benefits.


While learning about GDI systems, on YouTube for instance, you will find a lot of information concerning carbon buildup on the intake valves due to crankcase blow-by being introduced to the intake manifold, rather than overboard or into a catch can, as on all aircraft engines. Since only air passes through the intake runners on the Viking 130, no carbon deposits are possible. You are left with only the GDI advantages and none of the drawbacks.